Building a Pinhole

I really liked the idea of making a working pinhole camera and was intrigued by the numerous custom designs; so I thought I should build a more sophisticated design than the pringle pot camera.

The pringle pot camera had some disadvantages, one of them and most important being, the size of paper I could fit on the lid. Many people used the body of the pot to load the paper and a hole across it, but I didn’t like the idea I knew how wide angled photographs they’d be. The second issue was the focal length. Because of its shape and the way I placed the paper and the hole I had a focal length of 237mm, which limited my field a lot.

I went ahead to build a new one, that would be rectangular, flexible and user friendly. As I was leaving Ellen Terry building I noticed the staff had put out many file folders and boxes that were second hand, but in a good shape. I picked three of them to have options in case my experiment didn’t go well.

The advantage with these boxes is that they are ready-made and the only things left to modify is the light-proofing capability as well as make a hole. I used mostly electrical tape, gaffer tape and some packaging carton paper and a paper cutter. The camera can hold up to 5x7in paper negative, it has an aperture of 108.33 and a working aperture of 128. The focal length is 70mm, but it can be adjusted to smaller focal lengths. The size of the hole is about 0.6mm and that can change when need to. I tested it and there were no light leaks.

   

 

____________________________________________________

negatives and positives

photography area negatives
photography area test strips
photography area positive prints

____________________________________________________

bike stands negatives
bike stands test strips
bike stands final positives

(more prints on Task 1 post.)

Because with this pinhole I didn’t plan and just added up features along the way, it had some small issues. So I decided to start a new one from scratch, build it after I have designed it and buy proper material instead a ton of tape. I bought some pva glue, more tape if in need, found more carton paper and started. My main concern was to make it light-proof without compromising its outer structure so as to open and close like it was made to. Unfortunately it’s not ready yet, because other things came up but I have got photographs of it to show you how it looks so far.

                  

   

One thought on “Building a Pinhole”

  1. I Am Going To have to come back again whenever my course load lets up – however I am taking your Feed so i can go through your web blog offline. Cheers.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s